Changes to the Highway Code: Hierarchy of Road Users

On 29 January 2022, the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) will publish changes to the Highway Code. The changes made include the amendment of 35 existing rules, the introduction of 12 new and renumbered rules and a new section on the Hierarchy of Road Users.

The changes are focused on responsibilities and junctions. The introduction of a hierarchy of road users ensures those who can do the greatest harm have the greatest responsibility to reduce the danger or threat they may pose to others.

The changes also clarify the existing rules on pedestrian priority on pavements, which state that drivers and riders should give way to pedestrians crossing or waiting to cross the road.

Furthermore, the changes establish guidance on safe passing distances and speeds when overtaking cyclists or horse riders, and ensures they have priority at junctions when travelling straight ahead.

A major change is the addition of a Hierarchy of Road Users.

Hierarchy of Road Users

The ‘Hierarchy of Road Users’ places those road users most at risk in the event of a collision at the top of the hierarchy. This does not, however, remove the need for everyone to behave responsibly. The road users most likely to be injured in the event of a collision are:

  • pedestrians,
  • cyclists,
  • horse riders,
  • motorcyclists,
  • children,
  • older adults, and
  • disabled people.

The following ‘H’ rules clarify this.

Rule H1

It is important that all road users are aware of The Highway Code, are considerate to other road users and understand their responsibility for the safety of others. Everyone suffers when road collisions occur, whether they are physically injured or not. However, those in charge of vehicles that can cause the greatest harm in the event of a collision bear the  greatest responsibility to take care and reduce the danger they pose to others. This principle applies most strongly to drivers of large goods and passenger vehicles, vans/minibuses, cars/taxis and motorcycles. Cyclists, horse riders and drivers of horse drawn vehicles likewise have a responsibility to reduce danger to pedestrians.

None of this detracts from the responsibility of all road users, including pedestrians, cyclists and horse riders, to have regard for their own and other road users’ safety. Always remember that the people you encounter may have impaired sight, hearing or mobility, and that this may not be obvious.

Rule H2

Rule for drivers, motorcyclists, horse-drawn vehicles, horse riders and cyclists

At a junction, you should give way to pedestrians crossing or waiting to cross a road into which or from which you are turning. You must give way to pedestrians on a zebra crossing, and to pedestrians and cyclists on a parallel crossing (see Rule 195). Pedestrians have priority when on a zebra crossing, on a parallel crossing or at light-controlled crossings when they have a green signal. You should give way to pedestrians waiting to cross a zebra crossing, and to pedestrians and cyclists waiting to cross a parallel crossing. Horse riders should also give way to pedestrians on a zebra crossing, and to pedestrians and cyclists on a parallel crossing. Cyclists should give way to pedestrians on shared-use cycle tracks and to horse riders on bridleways. Only pedestrians may use the pavement. Pedestrians include wheelchair and mobility scooter users. Pedestrians may use any part of the road and use cycle tracks as well as the pavement, unless there are signs prohibiting pedestrians.

Rule H3

Rule for drivers and motorcyclists

You should not cut across cyclists, horse riders or horse-drawn vehicles going ahead when you are turning into or out of a junction or changing direction or lane, just as you would not turn across the path of another motor vehicle. This applies whether they are using a cycle lane, a cycle track or riding ahead on the road. Do not turn at a junction if to do so would cause the cyclist, horse rider or horse-drawn vehicle going straight ahead to stop or swerve.

You should stop and wait for a safe gap in the flow of cyclists if necessary. This includes when cyclists are:

  • Approaching, passing, or moving off from a junction,
  • Moving past or waiting alongside stationary or slow-moving traffic, and/or,
  • Travelling around a roundabout.

New and renumbered rules

New rules for cyclists

Rule Description Applicable from 29 January 2022

63 New rule to replace 63 Sharing space with pedestrians, horse riders and horse-drawn vehicles

  • When riding, take care when passing pedestrians and horse riders, especially children, older adults, or disabled people.
  • Slow down when necessary and let them know you are there; for example, by ringing your bell (it is recommended that a bell is fitted to your bike), or by calling out politely.
  • Remember that pedestrians may be deaf, blind or partially sighted and that this may not be obvious.
  • Do not pass pedestrians, horse riders or horse-drawn vehicles closely or at high speed, particularly from behind.
  • You should not pass a horse on their left.
  • Remember that horses can be startled if passed without warning. Always be prepared to slow down and stop when necessary.

 

72 New rule Road positioning

When riding on the roads, there are two basic road positions you should adopt, depending on the situation.

1 Ride in the centre of your lane, to make yourself as clearly visible as possible, in the following situations:

  • On quiet roads or streets – if a faster vehicle comes up behind you, move to the left to enable them to overtake, if you can do so safely,
  • In slower-moving traffic – when the traffic around you starts to flow more freely, move over to the left if you can do so safely so that faster vehicles behind you can overtake, and/or,
  • At the approach to junctions or road narrowing’s where it would be unsafe for drivers to overtake you.

2 When riding on busy roads, with vehicles moving faster than you, allow them to overtake where it is safe to do so whilst keeping at least 0.5 metres away, and further where it is safer, from the kerb edge. Remember that traffic on most dual carriageways moves quickly. Take extra care crossing slip roads.

 

73 New rule Junctions

  • Some junctions, particularly those with traffic lights, have special cycle facilities, including small cycle traffic lights at eyelevel height, which may allow you to move or cross separately from or ahead of other traffic. Use these facilities where they make your journey safer and easier.
  • At junctions with no separate cyclist facilities, it is recommended that you proceed as if you were driving a motor vehicle (see Rules 170 to 190). Position yourself in the centre of your chosen lane, where you feel able to do this safely, to make yourself as visible as possible and to avoid being overtaken where this would be dangerous. If you do not feel safe to proceed in this way, you may prefer to dismount and wheel your bicycle across the junction.

 

74 New rule to replace 72 Turning

  • If you intend to turn left, check first for other cyclists or motorcyclists before signalling.
  • If you are turning right, check the traffic to ensure it is safe, then signal and move to the centre of the road. Wait until there is a safe gap in the oncoming traffic and give a final look before completing the turn. It may be safer to wait on the left until there is a safe gap or to dismount and push your cycle across the road.
  • When turning into or out of a side road, you should give way to pedestrians crossing or waiting to cross (see Rule H2).

 

75 New rule Two stage turns

At some signal-controlled junctions there may be signs and markings informing cyclists to turn right in two stages:

Stage 1: When the traffic lights turn green, cyclists wishing to make the turn should go straight ahead to the location marked by a cycle symbol and turn arrow on the carriageway, then stop and wait there.

Stage 2: When the traffic lights on the far side of the junction, now facing the cyclists, turn green, they should then complete the manoeuvre.

 

76 New rule Going straight ahead

  • If you are going straight ahead at a junction, you have priority over traffic waiting to turn into or out of the side road, unless road signs or markings indicate otherwise (see Rule H3). Check that you can proceed safely, particularly when approaching junctions on the left alongside stationary or slow-moving traffic. Watch out for drivers intending to turn across your path. Remember the driver ahead may not be able to see you, so bear in mind your speed and position in the road.
  • Take great care when deciding whether it is safe to pass stationary or slow-moving lorries and other long vehicles, especially at the approach to junctions, as their drivers may not be able to see you. Remember that they may have to move over to the right before turning left, and that their rear wheels may then come very close to the kerb while turning (see Rule 67).

 

77 New rule to replace 75 Busy roads

When crossing faster or busy main roads, you may find it safer and easier to:

  • Dismount and push your cycle across,
  • Wait for a safe gap in the traffic before doing so, especially on faster roads and dual carriageways, and/or,
  • Make use of traffic islands or central reservations to help you where appropriate.

 

78 New rule to replace 76 Full details about the correct procedure at roundabouts without cycle facilities are contained in Rules 184 to 190.

  • Watch out for vehicles crossing your path to leave or join the roundabout, remembering that drivers may not easily see you.

 

79 New rule to replace 77 If you are turning right, you can ride in the left or right-hand lanes and move left when approaching your exit. Position yourself in the centre of your lane if it is safe to do so (see Rule 72) and signal right to indicate that you are not leaving the roundabout. Alternatively, you may feel safer walking your bicycle round on the pavement or verge.

If you decide to ride round keeping to the left-hand lane, you should:

  • Be aware that drivers may not easily see you.
  • Take extra care when cycling across exits. You should signal right to show you are not leaving the roundabout.
  • Watch out for vehicles crossing your path to leave or join the roundabout. Where a roundabout has separate cycle facilities, you should use these facilities where they make your journey safer and easier although you are not obliged to use them. This will depend on your experience and skills and the situation at the time.

 

80 New rule to replace 78

 

81 New rule to replace 79

 

82 New rule to replace 80 Crossings

  • Toucan crossings are light-controlled crossings which allow cyclists and pedestrians to share crossing space and cross at the same time.
  • Pedestrians and cyclists will see the green signal together. Cyclists are permitted to ride across.
  • You may ride across, but you MUST NOT cross until the green cycle symbol is showing.
  • Cycle track crossings can be in spacious pedestrian environments. Cyclists should look out and be prepared to stop for pedestrians crossing the track informally as well as at these designated points.

Take extra care when crossing level crossings and tramways (see Rule 306). You should dismount at level crossings where a ‘cyclist dismount’ sign is displayed.

 

Amended rules for road users

Rule Description Applicable from 29 January 2022

Update to text to ensure readers understand

  • Pavements and footways (including any path along the side of a road) should be used if provided.
  • Always remain aware of your environment and avoid unnecessary distractions.

 

Update to text to ensure readers understand

  • Organised walks or parades involving large groups of people walking along a road should use a pavement if available. If one is not available, they should keep to the left.

 

Update to text to ensure readers understand

At a junction

  • When you are crossing or waiting to cross the road, other traffic should give way.
  • Look out for traffic turning into the road, especially from behind you, and cross at a place where drivers can see you.
  • If you have started crossing and traffic wants to turn into the road, you have priority, and they should give way (see Rules H2 and 170).

 

13 Update to text to ensure readers understand

Routes shared with cyclists

May be separated by a feature such as a change of material, a verge, a kerb or a white line.

  • Cyclists should respect your safety (see Rule 62), but you should also take care not to obstruct or endanger them. Always remain aware of your environment and avoid unnecessary distractions.
  • Where signs indicate, some routes are shared between pedestrians, cyclists, horse riders and horse-drawn vehicles. Cyclists, horse riders and drivers of horse-drawn vehicles should respect your safety, but you should take care not to obstruct or endanger them.
  • Always remain aware of your environment and avoid unnecessary distractions.

 

19 Update to text to ensure readers understand

Zebra crossing

  • Drivers and riders should give way to pedestrians waiting to cross and MUST give way to pedestrians on a zebra crossing (see Rule H2).
  • A zebra crossing with a central island is two separate crossings (see Rule 20).

 

52 Update to text to ensure readers understand

Riding

  • If you are an inexperienced horse rider or have not ridden for a while, consider taking the Ride Safe Award from the British Horse Society. The Ride Safe Award provides a foundation for any horse rider to be safe and knowledgeable when riding in all environments but particularly on the road. For more information, see www.bhs.org.uk

 

59 Updated rules regarding clothing for cyclists to improve wording and layout

  • Wearing light-coloured or fluorescent clothing can help other road users see you in daylight and poor light, while reflective clothing and/or accessories (belt, arm or ankle bands) can increase your visibility in the dark.
  • You should wear a cycle helmet that conforms to current regulations, is the correct size and is securely fastened.

 

61 Updated rule for Cycle Routes and Other Facilities to improve wording and layout.

  • Cycle lanes are marked by a white line (which may be broken) along the carriageway (see Rule 140).
  • Use facilities such as cycle lanes and tracks, advanced stop lines and toucan crossings (see Rules 62 and 73) where they make your journey safer and easier.
  • While such facilities are provided for reasons of safety, cyclists may exercise their judgement and are not obliged to use them.

 

62 Update to text to ensure readers understand

Cycle tracks

  • These are routes for cyclists that are physically protected or located away from motor traffic, other than where they cross side roads (see Rule 206). Cycle tracks may run alongside footpaths or pavements and be separated by a feature such as a change of material, a verge, a kerb or a white line.
  • Some cycle tracks shared with pedestrians will not be separated by such a feature. On such shared use routes, you should always take care when passing pedestrians, especially children, older adults or disabled people, and allow them plenty of room. Always be prepared to slow down and stop if necessary (see Rule H2).

 

66 Update to text to ensure readers understand

  • Avoid any actions that could reduce your control of your bicycle.
  • Be considerate of the needs of other road users when riding in groups. You can ride two abreast and it can be safer to do so, particularly in larger groups or when accompanying children or less experienced riders.
  • Be aware of drivers behind you and allow them to overtake (for example, by moving into single file or stopping) when you feel it is safe to let them do so.

 

67 Update to text to ensure readers understand

You should:

  • Conduct good all-round observation before carrying out a manoeuvre.
  • Watch out for obstructions in the road, positioning yourself so you can move to avoid them safely.
  • Take care when passing parked vehicles, leaving enough room (a door’s width or 1 metre) to avoid being hit if a car door is opened, and watch out for pedestrians stepping into your path.
  • Be aware of traffic coming up behind you and give a clear signal to show other road users what you intend to do (see ‘Signals to other road users’). Take extra care near road humps, road narrowing and other traffic calming features.
  • When cycling on the road, only pass to the left of large vehicles when they are stationary or slow moving and you should proceed with caution as the driver may not be able to see you. Be particularly careful on the approach to junctions or where a large vehicle could change lanes to the left.

 

69 Updated references to traffic laws

71 Update to text to ensure readers understand

  • At traffic light junctions and at cycle-only crossings with traffic lights, you MUST NOT cross the stop line when the lights are red.
  • Some junctions have an advanced stop line to enable you to position yourself ahead of other traffic and wait (see Rule 178). When the traffic lights are red, you may cross the first stop line, but you MUST NOT cross the final stop line.

 

125 Update to text to ensure readers understand

  • The speed limit is the absolute maximum and does not mean it is safe to drive at that speed irrespective of conditions.
  • Unsafe speed increases the chances of causing a collision (or being unable to avoid one), as well as its severity. Inappropriate speeds are also intimidating, deterring people from walking, cycling or riding horses

 

140 Update to text to ensure readers understand Cycle lanes and cycle tracks

  • You should give way to any cyclists in a cycle lane, including when they are approaching from behind you – do not cut across them when you are turning or when you are changing lane (see Rule H3). Be prepared to stop and wait for a safe gap in the flow of cyclists before crossing the cycle lane.
  • Cycle tracks are routes for cyclists that are physically protected or located away from motor traffic, other than where they cross side roads. Cycle tracks may be shared with pedestrians.
  • You should give way to cyclists approaching or using the cycle track when you are turning into or out of a junction (see Rule H3). Be prepared to stop and wait for a safe gap in the flow of cyclists before crossing the cycle track, which may be used by cyclists travelling in both directions.
  • Bear in mind that cyclists are not obliged to use cycle lanes or cycle tracks.

 

144 Update to text to ensure readers understand You MUST NOT:

  • Drive dangerously.
  • Drive without due care and attention.
  • Drive without reasonable consideration for other road users. Driving requires focus and attention at all times. Remember, you may be driving dangerously or travelling too fast, even if you don’t mean to.

 

151 Update to text to ensure readers understand In slow-moving traffic You should:

  • Allow pedestrians and cyclists to cross in front of you

 

160 Update to text to ensure readers understand Once moving, you should:

  • Be aware of other road users, especially bicycles and motorcycles who may be filtering through the traffic. These are more difficult to see than larger vehicles and their riders are particularly vulnerable.

 

163 Update to text to ensure readers understand Overtake only when it is safe and legal to do so. You should:

  • Stay in your lane if traffic is moving slowly in queues. If the queue on your right is moving more slowly than you are, you may pass on the left. Cyclists may pass slower moving or stationary traffic on their right or left and should proceed with caution as the driver may not be able to see cyclists. Be careful about doing so, particularly on the approach to junctions, and especially when deciding whether it is safe to pass lorries or other large vehicles.
  • Give motorcyclists, cyclists, horse riders and horse-drawn vehicles at least as much room as you would when overtaking a car (see Rules 211 to 215). As a guide:
  • Leave at least 1.5 metres when overtaking cyclists at speeds of up to 30 mph and give them more space when overtaking at higher speeds.
  • Pass horse riders and horse-drawn vehicles at speeds under 10 mph and allow at least 2 metres of space.
  • Allow at least 2 metres of space and keep to a low speed when passing a pedestrian who is walking in the road (for example, where there is no pavement).
  • Take extra care and give more space when overtaking motorcyclists, cyclists, horse riders, horse-drawn vehicles and pedestrians in bad weather (including high winds) and at night.
  • You should wait behind the motorcyclist, cyclist, horse rider, horse-drawn vehicle or pedestrian and not overtake if it is unsafe or not possible to meet these clearances.

 

167 Update to text to ensure readers understand DO NOT overtake where you might come into conflict with other road users. For example:

  • On the approach to crossing facilities.
  • Where a vehicle ahead is slowing to stop for a pedestrian that is crossing from a pedestrian island (see Rule 165).
  • Stay behind if you are following a cyclist approaching a roundabout or junction, and you intend to turn left. Do not cut across cyclists going ahead, including those using cycle lanes and cycle tracks (see Rule H3).
  • Stay behind if you are following a horse rider or horse drawn vehicle approaching a roundabout or junction, and you intend to turn left. Do not cut across a horse rider or horse drawn vehicle going ahead.

 

170 Update to text to ensure readers understand Take extra care at junctions. You should:

  • Watch out for cyclists, motorcyclists and pedestrians including powered wheelchair/mobility scooter users as they are not always easy to see. Be aware that they may not have seen or heard you if you are approaching from behind.
  • Give way to pedestrians crossing or waiting to cross a road into which or from which you are turning. If they have started to cross, they have priority, so give way (see Rule H2).
  • Remain behind cyclists, horse riders, horse-drawn vehicles and motorcyclists at junctions even if they are waiting to turn and are positioned close to the kerb.

 

178 Update to text to ensure readers understand Advanced stop lines Some signal-controlled junctions have advanced stop lines to allow cyclists to be positioned ahead of other traffic. Motorists, including motorcyclists, MUST stop at the first white line reached if the lights are amber or red and should avoid blocking the way or encroaching on the marked area at other times, eg, if the junction ahead is blocked. If your vehicle has proceeded over the first white line at the time that the signal goes red, you should stop as soon as possible and MUST stop at the second white line. Allow cyclists, including any moving or waiting alongside you, enough time and space to move off when the green signal shows.

  • Drivers of large vehicles should stop sufficiently far behind the first white line so that they can see the whole area where cyclists may be waiting, allowing for any blind spot in front of the vehicle.

 

183 Update to text to ensure readers understand When turning:

  • Give way to any vehicles using a bus lane, cycle lane, cycle track or tramway from either direction, including when they are passing slow moving or stationary vehicles on either side.

 

186 Update to text to ensure readers understand Signals and position

  • You should give priority to cyclists on the roundabout. They will be travelling more slowly than motorised traffic. Give them plenty of room and do not attempt to overtake them within their lane. Allow them to move across your path as they travel around the roundabout.
  • Cyclists, horse riders and horse-drawn vehicles may stay in the left-hand lane when they intend to continue across or around the roundabout and should signal right to show you that they are not leaving the roundabout. Drivers should take extra care when entering a roundabout to ensure that they do not cut across cyclists, horse riders or horse-drawn vehicles in the lefthand lane, who are continuing around the roundabout.

 

187 Update to remove unnecessary text to ensure readers understand Removal of paragraph “Cyclists and horse riders who may stay in the left-hand lane and signal right if they intend to continue round the roundabout. Allow them to do so.”

 

192 Update to text to ensure readers understand In slow-moving and queuing traffic, you should keep crossings completely clear, as blocking these makes it difficult and dangerous for pedestrians to cross. You should not enter a pedestrian crossing if you are unable to completely clear the crossing. Nor should you block advanced stop lines for bicycles.

 

195 Update to text to ensure readers understand Zebra and parallel crossings As you approach a zebra crossing:

  • You should give way to pedestrians waiting to cross.
  • Do not wave, flash your lights or use your horn to invite pedestrians across; this could be dangerous if another vehicle is approaching.
  • Be patient, do not sound your horn or rev your engine as this can be intimidating. Parallel crossings are similar to zebra crossings but include a cycle route alongside the black and white stripes. As you approach a parallel crossing:
  • Look out for pedestrians or cyclists waiting to cross and slow down or stop.
  • You should give way to pedestrians or cyclists waiting to cross.
  • You MUST give way when a pedestrian or cyclist has moved onto a crossing.
  • Allow more time for stopping on wet or icy roads.
  • Do not wave, flash your lights or use your horn to invite pedestrians or cyclists across; this could be dangerous if another vehicle is approaching.
  • Be patient, do not sound your horn or rev your engine as this can be intimidating.
  • Be aware of pedestrians or cyclists approaching from the side of the crossing. A parallel crossing with a central island is two separate crossings (see Rules 19 and 20).

 

199 Update to text to ensure readers understand Toucan, puffin and equestrian crossings Do not enter the crossing if you are unable to completely clear it, to avoid obstructing pedestrians, cyclists or horse riders.

 

204 Update to text to ensure readers understand The road users most at risk from road traffic are pedestrians, in particular children, older adults and disabled people, cyclists, horse riders and motorcyclists. It is particularly important to be aware of children, older adults and disabled people, and learner and inexperienced drivers and riders. In any interaction between road users, those who can cause the greatest harm have the greatest responsibility to reduce the danger or threat they pose to others.

 

206 Update to text to ensure readers understand Drive carefully and slowly when:

  • Needing to cross a pavement, cycle lane or cycle track, for example, to reach or leave a driveway or private access. Give way to pedestrians on the pavement and cyclists using a cycle lane or cycle track.
  • Turning at road junctions; you should give way to pedestrians who are crossing or waiting to cross the road into which or from which you are turning.
  • Going through road works or when passing roadside rescue and recovery vehicles, as there may be people working in or at the side of the road.
  • Approaching zebra and parallel crossings as you MUST give way to pedestrians and cyclists on the crossing (see Rule 195).
  • Approaching pedestrians who have started to cross the road ahead of you. They have priority when crossing at a junction or side road so you should give way.

 

211 Update to text to ensure readers understand It is often difficult to see motorcyclists and cyclists, especially when they are waiting alongside you, coming up from behind, coming out of or moving off from junctions, at roundabouts, overtaking you or filtering through traffic. Always look out for them before you emerge from a junction; they could be approaching faster than you think. Do not turn at a junction if to do so would cause the cyclist going straight ahead to stop or swerve, just as you would do with a motor vehicle. When turning right across a line of slow-moving or stationary traffic, look out for and give way to cyclists or motorcyclists on the inside of the traffic you are crossing. Be especially careful when moving off, turning, and when changing direction or lane. Be sure to check mirrors and blind spots carefully.

 

212 Update to text to ensure readers understand Give motorcyclists, cyclists, horse riders, horse-drawn vehicles and pedestrians walking in the road (for example, where there is no pavement) at least as much room as you would when overtaking a car (see Rules 162 to 167). Drivers should take extra care and give more space when overtaking motorcyclists, cyclists, horse riders, horse-drawn vehicles and pedestrians in bad weather (including high winds) and at night. If the rider looks over their shoulder, it could mean that they intend to pull out, turn right or change direction. Give them time and space to do so.

 

213 Update to text to ensure readers understand On narrow sections of road, on quiet roads or streets, at road junctions and in slower-moving traffic, cyclists may sometimes ride in the centre of the lane, rather than towards the side of the road. It can be safer for groups of cyclists to ride two abreast in these situations. Allow them to do so for their own safety, to ensure they can see and be seen. Cyclists are also advised to ride at least a door’s width or 1 metre from parked cars for their own safety. On narrow sections of road, horse riders may ride in the centre of the lane. Allow them to do so for their own safety to ensure they can see and be seen.

 

215 Update to text to ensure readers understand Horse riders and horse-drawn vehicles Be particularly careful of horse riders and horse-drawn vehicles especially when approaching, overtaking, passing or moving away. Always pass wide and slowly. When you see a horse on a road, you should slow down to a maximum of 10 mph. Be patient, do not sound your horn or rev your engine. When safe to do so, pass wide and slow, allowing at least 2 metres of space. Feral or semi feral ponies found in areas such as the New Forest, Exmoor and Dartmoor require the same consideration as ridden horses when approaching or passing. Remember there are three brains at work when you pass a horse: the rider’s, the driver’s and the horse’s. Do not forget horses are flight animals and can move incredibly quickly if startled.

 

239 Update to text to ensure readers understand Use off-street parking areas, or bays marked out with white lines on the road as parking places, wherever possible. If you have to stop on the roadside:

  • You MUST ensure you do not hit anyone when you open your door. Check for cyclists or other traffic by looking all around and using your mirrors.
  • Where you are able to do so, you should open the door using your hand on the opposite side to the door you are opening. For example, use your left hand to open a door on your right-hand side. This will make you turn your head to look over your shoulder. You are then more likely to avoid causing injury to cyclists or motorcyclists passing you on the road, or to people on the pavement. When using an electric vehicle charge point, you should park close to the charge point and avoid creating a trip hazard for pedestrians from trailing cables. Display a warning sign if you can. After using the charge point, you should return charging cables and connectors neatly to minimise the danger to pedestrians and avoid creating an obstacle for other road users.

 

Annex 1 You and your bicycle updated text Following Logistics UK’s calls for stronger guidance about bicycle training to be included in the revised Highway Code, there is now information in Annex 1 about national standard cycle training such as Bicycleability, the benefits bicycle training offers and links to where more information can be found.

 

Annex 6 Vehicle maintenance, safety, and security, additions to text Take special care that lights, brakes, steering, exhaust system, seat belts, demisters, wipers, washers and any audible warning systems are all working Undertake all aspects of the daily walkaround checks for commercial vehicles as recommended by the DVSA and the Fleet Operator Recognition Scheme (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/van-drivers-daily-walkaround-check/vandrivers-daily-walkaround-check).

 

The above information is collated from a LogisticsUK briefing note.